#50: Go Adventure with Jeff Pelletier

Episode Notes and Description

“That’s really become my focus, that’s what I like to think of my niche, my differentiator on Youtube is I’m taking viewers to places they maybe forget having been but maybe never would’ve thought of going to.”

Welcome everyone to another episode of the It Matters To Me Podcast, a show that seeks out the passions in all of our lives and the motivations behind why we pursue them.

Today I have the one and only, Jeff Pelletier, professional ultra-runner and filmmaker.

You might know Jeff from some of his wildly popular and simply beautiful documentary films about trail-running all over YouTube these days.

Hailing from Vancouver, Jeff has traveled the world and filmed his adventures in places like Namibia, France, Patagonia, Georgia, really the list just goes on and on.

Finding running, specifically trail-running at a later age in his late twenties and early thirties, Jeff has made quite a name for himself in the endurance community.

And while he maybe isn’t setting course records at races like Western States, he’s encouraging more and more people to get outdoors through his films and work.

Knowing this was going to be my 50th episode, I really wanted to have someone on that I think embodies the narrative of this show, of finding that one thing in our life that gives us pure joy, and Jeff is just the perfect person to do that.

Before we get started, I recently had the privilege of testing out some new running gear courtesy of Naked Sports Innovations and let me tell you, I can’t sing their praises enough.

The waistband and hydration vest they sent are some of the most comfortable pieces of running gear I’ve used in years. I’ve actually just been leaving the waistband on all day because it’s so comfortable and useful.

Made with an ultra-breathable mesh material, it fits snugly around your waist and can carry poles, phone, water bottles, really whatever you feel like you’re going to need on your run.

Additional Links

Jeff Pelletier (Website): https://jeffpelletier.com/

Jeff Pelletier (Youtube): https://www.youtube.com/@JeffPelletier/videos

Jeff Pelletier (Instagram): https://www.instagram.com/jpelletier/

It Matters To Me (Instagram): https://www.instagram.com/adamcasey/

Transcript

Adam Casey 

Jeff, welcome to the show. It’s an honor to have you on. Thanks so much, Adam. I’m looking forward to our conversation. Yeah. So most people out there listening are gonna probably be pretty aware of you and your work. But a brief overview of it is, you’re a pretty big badass, this is the best way to put it, you’re an ultra distance runner, you’re a filmmaker. And a lot of your stuff is just not just based in Vancouver, where you’re at, you do a lot of awesome things around the world. But before we get into that, one way I like to start the show is with a question that I think ties a thread into each guest childhood and who they possibly are now. And that question is, if I knew you growing up, what kinds of stories would I tell about you?

Jeff Pelletier 

Well, you know, I think even now, I consider myself pretty entrepreneurial. I like to do things, you know, I didn’t go to university, and yet I consider myself to be fairly well educated, self educated. And I think I think I was the same growing up, I’d like to think people would have said, you know, that I’m always sort of trying new things. I had little businesses growing up. I mean, even in high school I had up early, you know, this is early days in the web, I had a web business that was starting to flourish right before the.com. Bust? I don’t know why I would think I was always trying to do things a little differently, for better or for worse, a little bit of anti authoritarian, authoritarian, 10 minutes, maybe. But yeah, I like to think it was, I don’t know, trying to be creative, and kind of thinking outside of the box, I like to think that my friends would have would have kind of said the same.

Adam Casey 

Would you have ever considered yourself competitive because I asked that because I growing up, I played a lot of team sports, and was lucky enough to play at the collegiate level. And now as a runner myself, I’ve never been I’ve never had like a competitive spirit. And I always have wondered what, how that would have really changed me. Like, I’ve always been that person. Like, yeah, I’ll compete with myself. But as Yeah, you know, people that I played American football with in college, I’m like, yeah, that person was just playing better than me. Like, there’s no way I’m going to compete with that. And but I’ve always wondered if, like, having a little bit of a competitive edge would have made things differently. And kind of curious if you would see yourself just because of that entrepreneurial, kind of like, maybe I’m competing against other businesses, if you would ever, if you would ever say that you were a competitive person.

Jeff Pelletier 

No, no, not at all. Not at all. I I didn’t play team sports, or I mean, I did as a kid, and I was not very good at sports. And I wasn’t an active person until my kind of early 20s When I started running to kind of jogging to lose weight and going to the gym, but I never took to team sports, and I still don’t play team sports. And I think that’s what appeals to me about running. It’s individualized. You know, we like to say it’s a team effort. And of course, there’s a supporting, you know, there’s a supportive element to it. It’s a community based sport, but trailrunning especially isn’t that competitive compared to say, triathlon or something? And that’s what appeals to me about it. You, you’re competing against yourself, you’re setting your own goals, I’m a very goal oriented person. So even what you know, whether it’s business or, you know, anything I’m setting out to do, it’s, it’s more about setting and achieving my own personal goal. It’s not about benchmarking against other people. So no, I would say I’m not a very competitive person, which maybe, maybe hurts me, I’m not the fastest runner, I mean, but that’s, that, I think, is maybe what kept me away from sports growing up as well, because so much of you know, so many sports are team based, and I, I, I didn’t really enjoy the team aspect, it was always about competition. I guess a lot of individualized sports as far as like track and field are also very competitive. So it just never really appealed to me. So it’s only more when I think when I discovered endurance athletics, it, I was never going to win a marathon or an ultra marathon. It was never about that. It was about okay, what you know, can I set a time goal? And can I achieve that? And that’s when that’s when things really took off for me and I really found that passion.

Adam Casey 

And so you mentioned you you got into running when? at a younger age when you were in your 20s and you were looking to lose weight, but yeah, could you tell me what your I love every runners origin story, and I know that sometimes there’s a lot of like, overlap where especially in the ultra community where there’s sometimes like battling with depression and addiction, and that’s definitely part of my own story, but I still think that every runners or run everywhere and his origin story is just probably one of the most beautiful things in the world. And I would just love to hear more about yours.

Jeff Pelletier 

No, so I should clarify in my 20s. I mean, I was active in the sense that I enjoyed the outdoors, I always have, I grew up in scouts and you know, things like that, and sailing, and I took to hiking in my 20s. And I started going to the gym and, you know, again, you start to kind of, you know, you’re putting on weight a little bit, so you start to jog, but I wasn’t, I was probably doing a few kilometers at a time, you know, going over 25 minutes, I didn’t consider myself a runner until my late 20s. And I actually remember exactly the catalyst for it. I was 27. And I remember reading somewhere that 27 is supposed to be your physical peak as a as a as a guy. And I didn’t feel like I was at the peak of much. And it just so happened that a friend of mine was training for a marathon, it was kind of a bucket list thing for him. And I think he had hell hell Higgins run, walk, you know, your first marathon training guide or something. And then I think he hurt himself, I think he got injured, and he, he’s not gonna bother doing this anymore. You want the book? And I thought, you know, if you can do it, the I can do it. You know, he was just a regular guy. And I thought, well, how cool would it be to do a marathon to say you’ve done one, right? So I remember going out and starting to train. And I remember running my first 10k on a training run like that was I went from like five to maybe 10 or 11k. And that feeling like well, maybe I can go further. And, you know, really push this and I mean, I did horrible. Like, I didn’t know how to train I did horribly my first marathon but but then it gave me again, that goal that I could improve, and I could and I kind of got the running bug from there. So I was 27, when I ran my first marathon, I did that a few seasons in a row. And then I was about 30, when I found trail running. And that’s when, you know, I was getting diminishing returns with road running as you do, you know, you’re you work super hard for six months. And, again, I am going into person, but you know, I recognize at some point when you’re, you know, maybe it’s time to move on to something else. And with trail running, there’s just so many more variables and and I think really, there was a community aspect to it. And so as soon as I met this community, in the tradition of trail runners, it became less about the goals and more just about getting out and playing in the mud. And you know, it combining my passion for the outdoors, with trying to stay fit.

Adam Casey 

And that passion for the outdoors. You know, in kind of preparing for this, it was one of those where I’ve been you know, we’re talking a little bit before we actually started recording like I’ve been a fan for years and but only as I was preparing for this and I really like take stock like Man, this guy’s been all over the world. Like you’re you know, you’ve raised Namibia, you raised Georgia, you know, we you were just down at home. It’s not too much of a spoiler, but you were just down in South America. Yeah, Patagonia, yep, you, you you have taken. And that’s what I think is like, in a meanness in every sense of the word. That’s what I think is really so inspiring about your work is you’ve got you’ve taken something that a lot of people, which is running, and you’ve experienced, you’ve had worldly experiences with it. And I know that that is one thing that’s had a positive impact on me. Whereas I’ve definitely been trying to be more exploratory with my own running where I’m, I’m just like a creature of habit. I live in Colorado, I find the one trail that I like, and I will just hammer that trail for every day for years. But now, you know, kind of through some of your work, I’m like, Well, wait, no, I want to go, I want to go run through Georgia, I want to go you know, to some of these places and see these things. So what was kind of the impetus for you to like, progress from just okay, I’m running because I’m trying to stay in shape. And I just wanted to have a goal and finish a marathon. So like, Okay, I’m spirit experiencing a trail. And this is like a fun community. But this is still something that like, others do in my free time. How do you kind of make that jump to where you’re at now where you’re your professional runner, and you definitely like I said, you travel the world to do this.

Jeff Pelletier 

I you know, and I think this is something I take for granted this, this idea of, you know, this, this passion for the outdoors, I you know, haven’t grown up here and right near the border, actually, in Vancouver here. I grew up on the water, you know, in sort of a fairly undeveloped area. We were always in the beach, and we were sailing, and then in in scouts, you know, doing lots of hiking, and then in my 20s You know, I did I set a goal to travel a lot. And I think my goal, you know, I sort of sort of said I want to do an international trip once a year and kind of see the world and, you know, I had Kilimanjaro and was doing a lot of things, but I wasn’t I didn’t consider myself an athlete. And I didn’t consider myself an avid outdoorsman. I just, I thought this is what people do. Right. And maybe maybe that’s something I take for granted that you know, not everybody likes being outside and getting dirty and getting sweaty. I think they’re missing out on something if they don’t I mean, I think this is a natural part of who we are as humans right and So I think, first of all, that’s something I probably take for granted that that’s that I just assume everybody shares this passion. The the travel part of it for me as well, again, I just happen to love traveling. So when I, I think what you know, as I said, trailrunning became, it was an evolution of me looking for something some way to be active. To become an athlete, I, you know, I started to enjoy the act of running. But it wasn’t until I started training that I loved being outside and running as a lifestyle. And then I realized, well wait, I can combine this with my, if it’s a passion, or if it’s a desire to travel, and to see the world. And trail running is perfect for that. I mean, I think road running as well, you can run marathons and every major city around the world, you want to see Berlin, Paris, whatever, you know, seeing it from from the road is great. But you can you can see a lot more from the trails. And that’s now Yeah, that’s really become my focus. And that’s my I like to think of my niche or my differentiator on YouTube is that I’m, I’m taking viewers to places they may be, you know, forget having been, but maybe would have never had never thought of going to, you know, the Azores Islands, I was there in December. And that’s, that’s a place that growing up in the west coast here, you know, we go to Hawaii and Hawaii is beautiful, but the Azores Islands are, it’s Portugal. And it’s you know, it’s the best of Hawaii with the best of Portugal. It’s it’s an amazing destination with direct flights from Toronto. So that’s something where I hope people see that and go, Okay, I’m going there next year, you know, but I think as well I’m, I’m coming to terms with the idea that I mean, where I live here in British Columbia is one of the most beautiful places in the world. So my, you know, here I am, I have a fairly large carbon footprint right now. And I do still plan on continuing to travel for the foreseeable future. But I think part of what I’d like to inspire people to do is to explore their own backyard as well. And I really should be taking that to heart myself, but I definitely will, at some point, settle down and do that and really focus on you know, maybe filming more content here locally. But what I do love seeing are comments where people say something like, I’m from that place you just visited and I had no idea it was this beautiful, you know what I mean? So that’s like, if I can go to a different country and inspire the people who live there to explore their backyard. I think that’s, that’s an even bigger one. In addition to maybe having other people travel a bit to some lesser known locations, and help to spread around some, maybe some money to some developing countries as well, I think that’s that’s also always a win.

Adam Casey 

Yeah, and kind of on that same line, you know, not only do you go to these places, and you have these experiences, but you you also you’re a filmmaker, and you create films around it in these films. I mean, like, it’s, for me my Saturday, it’s like, my favorite Saturday routine is I go for a really long run here in Colorado, and I’ll come back. And then as I’m like, you know, kind of recovering from the run, maybe waiting to go out for like an evening hike or something, you know, have lunch and then on, I’ll just put on the TV. And when I put on TV is some of your film, some of you just running around the world. And it’s like, I just got done spending, you know, two or three hours running trails, maybe not in the deepest parts of Colorado, but I still was outside. And now I come back. And it’s like, almost ironic that I’m putting on a video of someone else trail running while I’m making lunch and stuff. But it’s still it’s, it’s one of my favorite things. And so, where, at what point did you kind of make that connection to where you were going out and you’re running and you were having the experiences you need to realize like, oh, wait, you know, what I should do is I should make films about this so other people can share this experience.

Jeff Pelletier 

Yeah, you know, I should say, actually, the irony is that, for me, Colorado is somewhere I would aspire to. I mean, it’s if I lived in the States, that would be the state I would live in. It’s one of the most beautiful places in the world to me, Colorado, I absolutely loved the mountains, the San Juan Mountains especially. So that’s that that grass is always greener kind of mentality. So I, I sort of stumbled into this, I’m, I’m a filmmaker by trade. I’m a video producer, I run a video production agency, that’s my primary source of income, been running my business for close to two decades, really my entire working career. And it’s become a bit of a full time income, but part time job and that’s what frees me up to do the things I do. And I also have the the experience and the knowledge and some of the equipment to do it. But I sort of stumbled into filming some of my adventures. I mean, I filmed a trek in Nepal years ago, with no intent to make a documentary. I was just kind of filming and then kind of halfway through the trip, I thought, hey, maybe I’ll like make a little film and ended up publishing and that films done very well over the years and A few years went by, before I did that, again, I did my first 200 mile race in the Italian Alps toward Asia, which is an incredible event, it just happens to be one of the biggest and most popular events in the world. And I filmed that. And again, I didn’t really have necessarily a goal, I knew I’d make a video, I didn’t know how long and I figured out, throw it up on YouTube. And that video really is what changed. That was the catalyst for taking my channel in the direction that I did. And it really helped to grow my audience. And again, it was sort of I was just sort of trying something and that video as well as performed quite well. And I think I realized in doing that, and publishing that and reading the feedback that like, actually, I think what I’m good at isn’t necessarily running or even filmmaking, but it’s still making while running. And that marrying those two things, you know, being having not slept in three days, and being super tired, and being able to switch modes opposite switch hats, and become a filmmaker, all of a sudden, in the moment to then go back to being, you know, a zombie marching runner, I realized that maybe I’m good at that, that, that crossover, that. That’s kind of my niche. So that’s the next year, I did another tuner mile race in the Swiss Alps, I film that, and just kind of started to build on that. But honestly, it’s only been in the last couple of years that I’ve really started investing time, in that I have kind of a long term plan for my channel. So it’s really only been, you know, my channels been up for years. And again, publishing maybe a film or two a year, until the last couple of years, kind of, say three years, really, during the pandemic, is the pandemic forced me to reassess kind of what’s important to me. And I realized what I was really missing was travel and experiencing new places, meeting new people, doing big events that excite me, big running events, and, and challenges. And so I started planning, like, as soon as this is over, I’m going to hit it hard. And I did you know, I went to Africa, I went to and I’ve been traveling ever since. And this year is going to be even bigger. So again, it it’s sort of, I sort of feel like I fell into it. And yet, this was always my plan. When I started my business close to two decades ago, my plan always was start a corporate video production agency do that for long enough until I can afford to do passion projects, documentaries, I always know when to make make documentaries. But I always figured I’d be working for National Geographic or something I didn’t. This was before YouTube. I never in a million years, what I imagined I was doing what I’m doing now, which is just producing short films and self publishing on YouTube, that wasn’t an option back then. And yet, this was always kind of the plan all along, was to start a business, hone my craft, and get to a position where I have the time and the financial capability to kind of follow my passion. And so it kind of it kind of worked out. But it’s that sort of, you know, success is never a straight line from point A to B it’s a squiggly line. But in hindsight, it’s almost like a planned it.

Adam Casey 

I would say it’s even without a plan. It’s it’s going it’s going according to plan is, you know, when you look at I know, there’s like a great, I think it’s like a Picasso quote, and maybe the story’s a little anecdotal, but someone will at one point I asked him to, like, let’s say, like, make a drawing for for them at a party. And he says that, you know, they gave it to him. And they asked him how much like how much it costs or whatever. And his answer was like this egregious number. And they were like, well, how are you going to charge this much for just a simple drawing? And he says, well, because it took me 35 years to be able to get to this point to draw it. So I know for you, it’s not just a night and day like I woke up one day as a filmmaker and charged traveling the world kind of stuff. So do you do you think that like, filming makes you experience things differently? Because you kind of touched on it a little bit before where you know, you get to put on that? That film producer kind of hat and I think at least in one of your more recent videos and I think it was when you You did this, you did a multi day stage race across Georgia where you kind of talked about like, hey, not everything is going to be you know, peachy keen. Not everything is going to be this like really sunny like I’m running through the mountains in this mode, beautiful thing in the world. But does filming make you intentionally kind of experience something differently? And is that aspect? Is that difference? A good thing or a bad thing?

Jeff Pelletier 

Yeah, I think about this a lot. It’s both it there’s there are pros and cons. You know, for better or for worse. My experience does change by having a camera. For me. It’s a net positive. So some examples. I mean, when you you know, when we were in Patagonia, we did with we had a we worked with a group for the first week we’re hosting a group trip and our guide at one point reminded everybody you know, remember We’re gonna go up, this is gonna be an incredible view. But remember to put your camera down and soak it in as well don’t just look through your lens, right. And that’s something that you have to remind people sometimes, because it’s really easy to just be looking through your camera lens at something, and you’re not even really experiencing it necessarily directly. And that can happen anybody. For me, that’s something I need to remember. And there are moments that I, there’s that scene and I forget what the film was, but it was, you know, this is this idea of like, keeping moments just for you, you know, not having, I think, whether it was Sean Penn was a nature photographer, and he finally sees the, the animal in Nepal that wherever he is, and he doesn’t take the photo, you know, and he’s like, No, this one’s just for me. And there’s moments like that, where I say, I’m just going to experience this, I’m not going to document this, you know, I can, I can tell the story later, verbally, I don’t need to have a record of this on camera. So I try to avoid the negative And yet, there for me, it’s a net positive, because the camera gives me a perspective, like literally and figuratively, it gives me a lens to see the world through. In the sense that I’ll go to a place like, caves or, or, you know, somewhere where I’m traveling. And I’ll spend more time there, because I’m capturing the role. And I’m looking for the perfect light. And, um, you know, I’ll spend three hours on that waiting for that sunrise. And I will experience that sunrise, whereas if I wasn’t filming it, okay, we’ve been here for 15 minutes is getting cold, let’s go. So sometimes I immerse myself even more, I’m always looking for the shot. And in looking for the shot, I’m looking for the beauty in a place, I’m really looking at the details. So I feel like I’m more aware of my surroundings, in a sense, because I’m capturing things because I’m always looking for it for for what to film, when I travel to a new place as well. And this is again, for better or for worse. I go to the country of Georgia, for example. And I spend a week driving around, I am thinking about what do I need to include in the film? What are the must must cease locations or? And then also, what are the places maybe I could include that are off the beaten track that most people don’t see. But I am editing myself in a way I’m editing the trip to basic and around the film. So maybe I’m going to places I wouldn’t normally go if I wasn’t filming. And maybe I’m avoiding other places that I maybe I would go if I didn’t have to create engaging content. But I think there’s worse things in life than being a professional travel documentarian. Right. So that’s where again, for me, it’s a net positive because these the filmmaking process pays for me to go to these places. And at the end of the day, I love the filmmaking process. So when it comes to racing, you know, I often get asked, like, do I lose time? It’s like, well, of course I do. I mean, if I lose focus, for sure. filming myself, you know, at eight stations, I’m setting the camera down, I’m messing around, I’m forgetting things. You know how much time I don’t know, 30 minutes over the course of 100 kilometer race, maybe who knows, but I’ll never know. But it’s that 30 minutes is worth it to me, you know, finishing 10th Instead of seventh, or whatever it is, is worth it, to me to come out of it with a great story like to have documented a great story. So, for me, it’s still a net positive. But I do sometimes have to remind myself to set the camera down and to just, you know, look at it with my own eyes as well. So yeah, so I think you have to be careful of that.

Adam Casey 

I I totally agree with that. And I think this is maybe like a loose relation, but I one on one connection I kind of want to try and still make. Um, so I’ve done, I’ve done one 100 mile race and I kind of joke that like, you know, I did that in 2020. So almost like two and a half years ago. And I feel like I’m still recovering from that race. I know enough. I had you know, but I’ve been I’ve been an ultra runner for years and things and so I’m I’m at least well aware and well versed enough in in a race, like how low you can kind of get emotionally. But I also used to be in the Marines. And there’s this sense of like, it’s the phrase officers eat last and I was an officer. And so it’s this idea that like, nobody, you don’t get to sit down, you don’t get to eat, you don’t get to rest until every single one of you know for me, as a platoon leader, every one of my Marines had food in their stomach, you know, was able to rest themselves and was taken care of. And so the relationship I want to kind of make is like some of the hardest things I did in the Marines were on paper. You would I would actually say were like some of the easiest things because I wasn’t thinking about myself. I was thinking I was thinking about like, you know that 18 year old Lance Corporal who was carrying probably like half of his body weight up is mountain in and you know, as tired as I am, I’m sitting there thinking like, Okay, make sure he’s good, make sure he’s getting calories and make sure he’s drinking water and stuff. And so I want to say like, for you as a filmmaker, and I think maybe some of that net positive you’re talking about is that yeah, when you’re in those really low moments, just like, you know, setting up that camera at that aid station as small as that might be in a maybe as an annoying of a task. It might seem the moment it’s actually taking your mind away from the physical and emotional pain, you might be going through something like that. And so I don’t know if I’m reaching

Jeff Pelletier 

No, no, 100% I mean, it snaps you out of it. Sometimes it gives you perspective, it’s, you know, there’s something, you know, challenging happening, and I’m thinking, oh, shoot, I should be filming this. And, you know, so all of a sudden, I’m looking down on myself, like, I’m looking from a, you know, an outside perspective. So yeah, totally. I mean, that’s that, and I can think of a number of examples of times that’s happened, where I’ve been just exhausted. And I think, shoot, I gotta film that guy over there. He looks even more tired and all sudden, you know, I’m getting these low angle shots, and people are looking like, what what, aren’t you tired? And it’s like, oh, yeah, right. I forgot I was tired for a minute there. Because I, because I switched hats all of a sudden. And that’s where I think, you know, we talked about running being so much mental. And that tricks me into forgetting how much to how tired I am. I also like, I like having a project. So and that can sound silly. I mean, if I’m running 100 miles, that’s a big enough goal. But no, I like having a secondary project where it’s like one, because Because part of that, for me is even if my race goes horribly wrong, that in itself makes a great story. So there’s no such thing as a bad story in a race because no matter what the outcome, it’s going to be a good story. If even if I blow up disastrously, if I break my leg and have to get evacuated in a helicopter, that’s gonna make some great storytelling, right. So, so it’s kinda Yeah, it kind of gives me another, you know, instead of just a pass, fail, win, lose, you know, am I gonna achieve my goal? It’s like, well, no matter what happens, I’m gonna have a story to sell.

Adam Casey 

I love that. Yeah, in some way. I’m thinking like, maybe I should start just bringing a camera out, you know, I’ve got I’ve just I’ve got my first Ultra coming up next month here in Colorado after I had some pretty extensive ankle surgery last year where I had to get like some metal plates, but in and I mean, I feel confident enough, like, I wouldn’t have signed up for this race if I didn’t think I was going to finish but it’s one of those words like still, you know, still in the back of my mind, like, I don’t know, I haven’t gotten this far in, you know, since my surgery, but now I’m thinking like, maybe I should bring a GoPro and just try and film it just so that I can have that like goal of like, well, maybe like completely blow up. I’ll at least have it on camera.

Jeff Pelletier 

I don’t know if that’s even necessary. I think it’s more for anybody. It’s the it’s the mentality that it’s this idea of type one versus type two fun, right? Type One fun is, is you know, we’re jet skiing, and it’s fun in the moment. It’s ski like, you know, skiing or snowboarding at a resort. It’s type two fun is fun. And in hindsight, right. It’s, it’s, it’s, it’s a slog, but you’re glad you did it, at the end of the day. That’s running 100 miler. Like there’s moments of type one fun in there. But it’s mostly a lot of type two, it’s type two fun is what turns into great stories, type two fun, those are the stories you tell around the dinner table, you know, at a dinner party or whatever, those are the stories, you’re gonna tell your grandkids. And so I don’t think you need to film it, it’s still in, you know, you need to tell the story. The point is, we want to have stories, we want to have experiences, right? That’s the old thing about, you know, it’s, you know, it’s not the stuff we buy, it’s the experiences we accumulate over the years. And to me, it’s thinking as a storyteller experiences, our stories, whether you tell them or not, and whether you film them or not. It’s all about having stories to look back on and to tell if you choose to, and, and again, you don’t need to film them to necessarily to do that.

Adam Casey 

I want to move on. But one last question I kind of have on this is, would you consider yourself a filmmaker who runs? Or would you call you when you meet someone new? And they get asked that terrible question of what do you do for a living? Do you? Do you say I’m a filmmaker, and my favorite thing to do on the side is running? Or would you say like, No, I’m a runner, and I make films about my running?

Jeff Pelletier 

Yeah, I, it’s, I’ve thought about this question, too. recently. My accountant asked me this, because, you know, if, if the government asks, I am a professional runner, but actually, I have some travel expenses there too. So maybe I’m a professional filmmaker. I like to think of myself as a filmmaker who happens to be a runner, because if I wasn’t a runner, and one day I might not be right. I should always be able to tell stories. There’s a filmmaker that really inspires me named Beau Miles. And he is a great example of this. He sort of came to prominence on YouTube through a couple of running films. He made one about 100 miler. And he’s, he’s done kayaking adventures, he’s he’s traveled the world. But now he’s considered he considers himself a backyard adventurer in every sense of the word of the word. He literally will make a film a 25 minute film about living in a tree in his backyard. And it’s the most engaging, fun story possible. I mean, he’ll he’ll film himself running to, you know, what did he do? Like, he tried kayaking to work on these like canals and it took two days or something. And then finishes with him pulling his canoe, his kayak up into the office. So the idea is that there are adventures and stories even in our backyard. It’s, it’s about looking at it through the right lens. And just, you know, seeking the adventure in small things, he recently ran a marathon in a hotel. And it’s probably what looks like one of the most fun marathons you could run. I mean, it’s, you know, obviously had a great time. And so I look at that and think, you know, if I couldn’t run anymore, maybe I could still travel and tell stories that way. Or maybe we’ll shift into making content about bikepacking. bikepacking is something I’d love to explore as well. There’s certain routes and countries that definitely lend themselves more to long distance biking than running. Yeah, so I mean, I think I like to think of myself as an outdoor adventure filmmaker. I think that’s sort of my niche, travel and outdoor adventure. And right now I’m focused on running.

Adam Casey 

When I had my ankle surgery, it was after a base jumping accident. And so I wasn’t, yeah, I wasn’t too sure if I was ever going to be able to run again. And, you know, it’s easy to say in hindsight now to talk about being grateful for an experience like that. And I don’t even know if I’m still have it at the point where I want to use that language, but it is, for me like, that was, that was a really tough couple of months. Because it’s even just outside of breaking my ankle, I had a lot of other like life events that were happening. But what it did was a really kind of pose that question to me of, you know, I literally have a tattoo on my leg, that translates to I run, therefore I am. And so for me, it was like that question of like, well, what am I going to be if I’m not a runner? And really just sitting with that and trying to? Trying to answer that question, I don’t even know if I ever did. Because I was just so driven to like, Nope, I’m going to like, I’m going to run again. But that’s that’s a really hard question to ask. And I think, you know, I very much looked into maybe getting into bikepacking to it myself, or you know, trying to find other other ways that I could experience the outdoors but that’s man that that is a that is a tough, tough it’s a tough question. And I think it’s a really important one to ask ourselves because like, like you just pointed out you can end up in situations where becomes an existential threat to our, our kind of our self identity.

Jeff Pelletier 

I was injured early on in my writing career. The for the for the for the first time, I remember. I remember what it was, it was some silly overuse injury and I went to my physio, and she kind of laughed and said, You runners, you really need a backup sport by bike bike for the next few months. And I did I did, it took three to six months to get back on my feet. In the meantime, I got a road bike, and I did my first fondo my first 100 Kilometer grant, I did the GranFondo Whistler from Vancouver to Whistler, which is an incredibly beautiful course. And I had a great time, and I had an A now I have a second sport, or at least I did I, I don’t bike as much anymore. But for a long time cycling, I considered my secondary sport so I could cross train on the on the bike. That to me was a blessing in disguise. That was a lesson I had to learn. And what it did was it taught me that I like I love running. I love trail running. I love being in the mountains. But what I love are the mountains first of all, but even that I love deserts too. I love oceans. I love I love being outdoors. And I love endurance sports. I like pushing myself over time having to dig deep logistics planning that adventure component of adventure sports. And that’s where it connected to me the running is just a just one way to accomplish that. But again, if I if I know I would enjoy if I had to I could switch to biking. I was talking to a friend yesterday about paragliding that’s becoming quite a little bit more prominent here in North America and you go to a place like Annecy in France and you look up at the skies and there’s hundreds of people about the paraglider. What a great way to seek adventure in the mountains. I mean, there are races there’s long distance races where you do stages of paragliding racing. And again, there’s there’s other ways to accomplish, you know some of these goals. So I think it’s really important to ask yourself, what is it about, you know, if you’re a runner, what is it about running you like you really enjoy because there will be times you can’t do it? And you have to make sure that You’re sort of prepared for that. I think mentally, so you can fall back on other things. trail riding in particular, I have some friends who have gone through some injuries or other other sort of life changes where they can’t run. And I know one thing that some people have expressed is they miss the community. You know, because they’ve realized, like, shoot, I’ve been running for so long, all of my friends who are runners and now I don’t see any my friends. And that’s where you can volunteer races, you can you can still be a part of that community without without the running. So again, I think it’s just examining what is it that you’re really enjoying about that sport? And can you find it and otherwise?

Adam Casey 

Yeah, I can’t advocate enough for just volunteer even if you’re not a runner, just volunteering at a trail race. It’s amazing. And you know, I’m, I’m going down to come to Arizona at the end, in like, a couple of weeks to just to course sweet for the Cocona to fit. Oh, sweet. Yeah. And just Yeah, and like I was actually, you know, I’ve told you before the I interviewed Dale garland, who’s the render render for hard rock, and part of one thing we talked about was just my own evolution of a runner, where when I got into this, when I was getting out of the military, it was more similar, like you were, it was like, Okay, I have this goal on my calendar, I’m going to train for it. And then I’m just going to treat it as, you know, just like a one off event. But now I’m at the point where I, my calendar is stacked with like, every other weekend, this summer, just, I’m either running a race, or I’m volunteering at a race where I’m just going to be a part of a race, because the community is really just so much fun to be around. And it’s just like some of the most, it’s, it’s the most random thing in the world to go to a trail to an ultra marathon and just run into people that you know, and that you’ve seen there before, but it’s such a such a fun and welcoming community that yeah, I just I can’t advocate enough and support that enough just to go and be a part of it, even if you’re not going to be a runner.

Jeff Pelletier 

Because it is such a ridiculous sport, when you think things we do and, and that’s why it’s like, you know, we set these lofty goals and we put a lot into it. And we’re heartbroken when things don’t work out. And at the end of the day, it’s just ridiculous frivolous stuff we’re doing so I love watching other people do these ridiculous things. I love watching people suffer and helping them crewing them. But you know, coca don’t like, come on 250 miles to the desert. Like what are we doing out here? Right. So, and the only thing better than running it is watching other people run it.

Adam Casey 

Oh, man. Yeah, you know, it’s, yeah, I can already. I’m already thinking to myself, like, you know, there are times in my life where I get you know, I get hit with that, like little bit of a jealousy bug of like, oh, man, I wish I was out there doing this. But this is one of those from like, No, I want to be good just sitting there. Not not running, you know, telling myself like Yeah, I’m good. Like, I don’t need to, you know, I don’t need to do to under 50 and 250 miles in the desert. I don’t even know if my body would be able to handle that. But it’s

Jeff Pelletier 

an end and volunteering. Pacing is a great way to be be part of it. I have paste on the hard rock course it can be hard rock twice. Now the first time I did almost half the course 45 miles with my friend Kevin Douglas. And Hard Rock is notoriously hard to get into. I’ve been trying for years. But then I paste again another 10 mile section. Last year, my buddy Ken leg. So I’ve seen 55 miles of it. I’ve hiked another 10 miles or so on my own. So I’ve seen a good chunk of it, which, hey, it’s free. And I didn’t have to get into the lottery to do it. And I was feeling much better for those 50 miles that I paced compared to, you know, the race are doing 100 So definitely pacing is a great way to not only get experienced and to sort of see how these longer races work, but to kind of get to have fun and you still get to eat at the aid stations and all that so so yeah, pacing is great fun as well.

Adam Casey 

Food at the aid stations, I mean, if you need incentive enough, it’s it’s definitely that. Alright, so Well, you know, shifting gears a little bit. So you know, we’ve talked a little bit about you know, you love the process, or at least the planning process, but could you just kind of talk me through what is your planning process like now because not that there’s nowhere left in this world for you to explore, but you’ve been in so many places is that I think like how do you do you have like a map on your wall with a pin in it. And now you’re just like process of elimination like okay, now I want to go to this place. And then so like, how do you even decide somewhere new to go and once you’ve decided where you want to go, what’s your planning process, like from from start to finish?

Jeff Pelletier 

You have just got a map and I throw a dart that’s where I go next. I know I mean, I’m turning 42 this year and so I you know, we talked about how like you know where I happen to be in my my career and I feel very, very fortunate to have the opportunity as I do now. It was a process to get here you know it a bunch of things had to happen. For me to get to the position I’m in now and be able to travel and you know But I wish I was 32. Because I wish I had that much more of a career ahead of me. And so I’m realizing like, you know, I hopefully can do this for the next call it 10 years, you know, five to 10 years, if this is what I do for the next decade of my life, I think that’d be a pretty well lived decade. But I’m not getting any, any younger. So I have to really start prioritizing. And every, you know, I am looking at my writing career as a career and trying to plan it. And I have a huge bucket list. And unfortunately, I mean, everybody can relate to this, you check one thing off your list, and you add two more, right? Like your bucket list keeps growing. There’s a book I read, called Die empty. And it’s more about the creative process is this idea of like, get everything out, get all of your ideas out. And it’s an aspirational goal, because of course you never do, you never die truly empty, in the sense of you’ve checked everything off your list, you’re always still full of, you know, things you wish you could have done. So it’s an aspirational goal. But that’s something I do aspire to. And that includes destinations, I like to travel to, you know, adventures, I’d like to do different different challenges. So really, when I prioritize Now, part of my approach is looking at, on the one hand, I look at low hanging fruit. So you know, if I get invited to a race, which I do now, fortunately, I’ve been getting invited to different events, and sometimes those, that means having travel costs paid for and things like that, to me, that’s a low hanging opportunity. So I’ll usually jump on that. Because that might not be there next year. There’s other things where the it just happens to line up with the calendar. And you can all jump into that. So it’s kind of just a puzzle that I’m trying to piece together. And I look at it both short term. So what are my goals for this year? What am I trying to accomplish over the next five or so years? And kind of long term? I started to think about, like, you know, conflicts globally. I mean, there are places I wish I went to Europe. And when I graduated from high school in 99. And I wish I would have gone to Afghanistan or Iraq, there are places that are no longer safe to go to that, you know, haven’t been to and, and so things change. So sometimes it’s looking at, you know, what’s happening in the world. And even thinking about glaciers, I’d like to visit before they recede too far. I mean, this is, you know, again, the irony being I am flying and contributing to those some of those global warming effects to do that, but it’s a balancing act, yeah, it’s tough, it’s a great problem to have, it’s a great problem to have that there’s so much opportunity for a lot of those, like us, you know, especially myself, I’ve got a Canadian passport, which is, you know, I wish I had an EU passport. But it’s maybe one of the one of the next best passports, I can go anywhere, I rarely need a visa. And again, I can afford to do so. So it’s a great problem to have. But it is a problem. It is something I think a lot about that prioritization. I have, it’s always tempting to try to pack too much into a year as well. And then so it really right now for me is all about avoiding injury, you know, I can’t do any of this stuff. If I if I’m injured. Part of what we’re trying to do is balance this out. Now, my girlfriend, Audrey is becoming more part of the channel. And so I’ll be for example, we’re going to go to Switzerland in July. There’s the Eiger trail marathon, she’s going to run the 100k. And I was tempted to jump into maybe the 50, or the 100, as well. And I realized, oh, no, I can just film her race. So that film will be her story. And I’ll film Herdade stations and things and that, that now gives me a couple of weeks to recover from my goal in June and prepare for writing my next goal on August without, you know, the temptation of packing too much in. And I think eventually I’ll probably start doing more of that telling other people’s stories. But for now, it’s it’s Audrey is kind of becoming that secondary character. So anyway, it’s not really an answer for you. It’s not. But it’s I do have Yes, I have spreadsheets, and I have lists. And I’m, I’m always planning I mean, I’m planning adventures already for next spring. Now, you know, because a lot of these things you have to really think about, I’m starting to try to think about different grant opportunities, sponsorship deals and things I’m lining up for the future. We have a great opportunity to work with a company who’s providing an RV for our big adventure in Moab in October, and called ROS monster. And that was something that I’ve been working on for a couple of years, they reached out to me, and we just had nothing happening in the Colorado area, Colorado, Utah area. So that just kind of came together. And that’s going to be like an amazing adventure and amazing way to experience that by living in this RV for a few weeks. So yeah, it’s a big puzzle. I’m having a lot of fun kind of seeing it all come together. I’m thinking about, you know, the other thing we’re trying to think about is sort of trying to combine some of these trips, obviously, so instead of, you know, this year, finally I’m going to Europe and I’m staying there for three and a half months, I’m not gonna be traveling back and forth, and try to check off as much in a region as I can. You know, I really want to go to South Africa, but I realized, well, no, why don’t we Wait for a couple of years and try to move there for a few months and explore the region and check off a whole bunch of things while we’re there. So slowing it down, slower travel, really experiencing a place living in a place for a month, as opposed to just visiting it for a week, you know, getting a routine. That’s kind of becoming something I’m thinking about as well. So I don’t know, it’s, it’s, there’s so many opportunities, there’s so much do out there. It’s a big world. And I’m just I am learning more and more, and people reach out to me all the time with ideas for these amazing. They’re building new long distance routes, trails, constantly, there’s no there’s no thing. So it’s really exciting.

Adam Casey 

Well, if if you ever need somewhere to someone to go scout out a new location, or you definitely give me a bind, I have a I have a Yeah, I totally get that, you know, just in just when I was planning, like I said, putting stuff on my calendar for this, for this race season for this trail season. Everything I was trying to do is still trying to stay local, somewhat to Colorado, but it was still it fills up so quickly. And I’m already you know, already looking at like February 2023 for the or 2024 for for races because yeah, trying to be more intentional about planning and like making sure like, okay, yeah, well, what makes the most sense, like, should I drive halfway across the country right now just to go to this one event? Or should I wait a year, and then stay there for a few weeks so that I can do three different events on there. But yeah, man,

Jeff Pelletier 

what it’s not just races, I mean, races are getting harder and harder to get into almost everything’s a lottery nowadays. So you have to apply and, and you have to hedge your bets and apply to a few things. It’s also permits for some of these, these long distance trails. The John Muir Trail is one that I’ve really wanted to do. For years, part of the PCT, it’s probably the most beautiful section from Mount Whitney to, to Half Dome. And it you have to apply for a permit, they’re very hard to get. And I had one one year, I believe it was 2020. And I think it was COVID that got in the way that year. And so now I’m trying to make that one work again, and there’s only certain times a year you know that you can, that really makes sense weather wise and that fit within my Racing’s calendar. So that’s one that, you know, over the next few years, I hope to try to squeeze back in, but that’s pending, getting a permit. So some of these permits are getting harder to come by as well. Something like the tournament block, which is an amazing, you know, I have a film about that one that has been kind of making the rounds, because it’s it is a very popular trail. And as as such it, you have to kind of book that almost a year in advance to really get the refuges you want to stay in. So that is a long term planning thing. So when you’re thinking about booking all these things a year in advance, I mean, you got to think about your work schedule, your life schedule, you know, for the average person booked that time off. And, you know, it’s pretty easy to start thinking five to 10 years down the road. Now, you know, if you have a handful of these goals, and I think in a way, that’s a good thing I like to talk about, I like to remind people, new runners, you know, when I have friends who just start running and they, you know, maybe they have a really good first season, and then they get an injury. And I like to remind them, this is part of the part of being an athlete is dealing with injury dealing with setbacks. Whether it’s a race cancellation due to forest fires, say that’s something that’s increasingly a problem here in North America, or a pandemic or an injury, you need to look at your running as a career. Because if you get too hung up on a single season, it you’re it’s just an emotional roller coaster. So you need to look at this as a long term thing. And there’s always next season, we are going down to the Grand Canyon in about a week and a half or about a week, I should say. And the goal, me and a group of friends was to run rim to rim to rim. Well, two days ago, they announced the closure for the North Rim for the next six weeks or something. So that’s not going to happen. It’s bit of a blessing in disguise, because now we have an alternate plan to explore some other routes, some of their trails, I’ve done that route before, and we’re going to go explore some new trails instead. But it does put a damper on the film I had planned that I was hoping to make about the rim to rim so now it’s fine, I’ll go back next year, you know that that routes always going to be there. Whereas you know, would have been very easy for me to to have gotten hung up on that goal. And to, you know, to kind of get depressed about it. And to be sad that you know, we’ve got this flight down there and I can’t do the route I want to do. But this is trail running. This is mountain running. You know, this is part of what makes it so enjoyable. So you never know where you’re gonna get. And that’s for better or for worse, you know, you got to take it, take it as it comes when it comes to weather trail closures. Again, forest fires, I mean, this is all part of the game. So I think just always remembering this always next year. And there’s always, you know, some alternate version of what your plan was, you never quite know how things are going to work out and sometimes these alternate routes are better and they’re more interesting. So

Adam Casey 

yeah, yeah, you know, I think vo but the best experiences I’ve ever had in my life and what I would say what I would call the most fun extreme things they’ve ever had in my life were the most random. They were the ones that weren’t, you know, it didn’t arise or born in a part of an itinerary and planned out, they were just the ones that like, you just go in the moment. And when you reflect on them afterwards, you’re like, damn,

Jeff Pelletier 

I came up with a plan B or something where it was it was the fallback. Yeah. And it’s tough, because that’s the thing, we need to leave time in our schedules for serendipity for for chance, encounters chance opportunities. Somebody, you know, says, Hey, by the way, we’re doing this this weekend, you want to join, and you’re like, No, I have this training program, and I have a race and I can’t do anything. I’m all scheduled up. But again, it is tough, because you do need to plan these races. It’s I mean, I’ve only been a trail running for a decade now. But when I started even, you know, it was different. The you could sign up for these races last minute, you know, 50 K’s you could jump into it. And that’s all kind of change. So it’s a challenge, you do have to kind of, you know, be planning, like we were saying at least a season in advance usually.

Adam Casey 

Yeah, back in the good old days, when Western states if you qualified, you were in you didn’t have to enter an eight year lottery for it. That’s right. That’s right. Given all your experience, that you have now up to this point. Is there anywhere that you can think of that you would love to go back and experience again for the first time?

Jeff Pelletier 

Yeah, I mean, there are, you know, this is always a struggle, like this idea of, you know, your bucket list keeps growing. And so when you check something off, are you really done with that place? Right? Because so I can’t even think of the place I’ve been to that don’t that I didn’t want to go back to where I wasn’t always thinking, Oh, next time I come here, I’m going to do now that I know, I’m going to do this and this and this. We just got back from Patagonia, and we’re already planning to go back. And yet that’s, I mean, there’s an opportunity cost, of course, right, everywhere you go is a place somewhere else, you’re not going we only have so much time and resources. So, I mean, I There are places I’ve been to like, for example, I hiked Mount Kilimanjaro years ago. And I wouldn’t I don’t think I’d want to do that. Again, if I went back now, I’d want to see it through the lens of a trail runner, you know, how can I do it differently? Can I do it quickly? Can I you know, are there places I can go and not set an fkT but set a personal bests. You know, Nepal is another place that I was just starting trail riding at the time when I was in Nepal into the track. And I would love to go back and do some, some racing in Nepal at altitude or possibly even take on the Great Himalayan trail one day, which is a long distance route through to pop through their high route through Nepal. So I think definitely there’s you know, there’s, there’s always an opportunity to go back to a place and to do even to do the same route and a more challenging way or to do you know, new a new event that’s, that’s cropped up. And I do like going back to the same place when I when we have done that like Chamonix as a place we go pretty much every season now. And it starts to feel like I don’t know a second home in a way because you just you’ve already got your local favorite coffee shop, you know, like you just know the bus how the buses work like it. It’s so easy, right? So there’s definitely something appealing about that. I’d love to go back to Georgia or Namibia but but there’s just so many places to go as well. So it’s it’s tough to balance that out.

Adam Casey 

What’s your coffee shop in Chamonix? Because that’s, that’s a place that I

Jeff Pelletier 

I can’t remember what there’s a couple places I don’t I can’t remember what I’m sure it’s all good. We definitely have a favorite pizza place. I know there was one pizza place that’s like our go to. Yeah, but I can’t I can’t remember. I can’t remember what it’s called. But

Adam Casey 

it’s like yeah, it’s show money is one of those where I definitely have it on my on my list of places. And it’s and now it’s in the process of actually planning to go there not this year, but next summer, but ya know, I’m if, if I’m a fanboy of running, I’m definitely a fanboy of coffee. So anytime a call comes up. I’m definitely interested to hear more about that. Well, Jeff, you know, clearly I could talk to you probably forever and, but I know I want to I want to make sure that I keep us into a bit of a reasonable amount of time. But before we go kind of the whole point of this podcast, like we were talking before, it’s just finding that thing that just someone is stoked about that someone as hard as it might be to to think about it at times it’s like this is their this is their somewhat reason for living this is you know what they do and if they didn’t have it, yeah, you know, hopefully they’d be find something else. But the happy path is like this is what makes me feel whole or this is what makes the person feel whole. And so for you, I feel like you know, it’s a bit of both worlds where it’s filmmaking and adventuring and kind of ultra racing and, and trail running and things like that. But if you could, could you Try and just explain what trail running does for you and what, how you feel like it, it affects your life in a positive way. Well, I guess it’s better what why does this matter to you? Like, at the end of the day, why is this so important to you?

Jeff Pelletier 

Yeah, I mean, I think I, I look at that as like, what would I lose? If I didn’t have it? Like, what would I be missing? I think for me, it’s given me it’s a bit of a sense of purpose, a bit of a sense of identity. And I think part of that is even my work I’m doing now with with my YouTube channel has given me a sense of kind of purpose, I feel like I have a mission now. And part of that is kind of, you know, I mean, I get so many messages that people saying they’ve started trail running, because of me, maybe they were hiking before and they just started running, or they were a road runner, and they’ve taken to the mountains, or they’re, they’ve been encouraged to try their first Ultra, you know, or whatever it is. People saying things like, you know, I’m a runner, but I never thought of putting a tent on my pack and going fast packing. It starts to make me feel that there’s, you know, I’m accomplishing something, alright, other than just views, and, you know, maybe a little bit of ad revenue. And I start to feel like, I have an obligation to keep doing that, you know, there’s like people who are saying, like, please don’t stop doing this, do do more of it. And I think like, what kind of owe it to them to do it? Because I can, and I do enjoy it. So why not do more of it. So I really have a bit of a fire. You know, I wake up in the mornings, kind of like, like, right now, I have a lot of editing to catch up on I have a lot of projects on the backburner and that excites me, like I wake up excited to work, you know, I really do enjoy. And of course, I’m always excited about the next trip I’m going on. So the entire process to me excites me. runnings, part of that, but I think the running specifically, I mean, I never regret a run, I never get home, you know, sometimes it’s hard to get out of bed, but I never get home, I regret it. I love the sense of adventure, I think it connects with something primal, you know, going and playing in the mountains and, and sweating. And, you know, it’s that type two fun, I really do think it connects with something primal that we all have somewhere inside of us. And I really think it just gives me a sense of accomplishment, even if I do nothing else, but go on a seven hour run, you know, like a hike, hike, run kind of in the back country, I get home and think that’s that that can just be my day, I’m going to bed. And that’s, that’s a day well lived. And I think that, you know, we live in moments and days. And if you did that every day, you know, and you’re contributing in some positive way. And that’s kind of what you’re doing on a daily basis, I think that makes for a life well lived, you know, it’s I can’t really think of any other thing I’d rather be doing at the moment. And I think that I’m lucky to have found a great community of people and partners and a partner and Audrey to do to do that with some

Adam Casey 

I love that your experiences out there in what we’ve kind of already talked about are really, really are inspiring, and they really do help other people kind of just take stock of whether or not they’re they’re getting the most out of their day. And I know better than to try and live a day where you’re just like burning everything to the ground and trying, you know, metaphorically and just like trying to get the most out of the day. But if you if for me, I’m at the point where if I can look back past seven days and say a majority of those days, yeah, I was living my true self. I’m doing all right. And I feel like what some of your content, and when you do some of the things that you do, is they help they do inspire me, they helped me get down that path where I am actually, you know, you know, taking, taking advantage of the fact that I live in Colorado and making sure that I’m getting the most out of my time. So, ya know, I think as much as I’m fumbling over my words, I think your answer made a lot more sense than what I’m trying to say. But Jeff, this this has just been such a nourishing conversation. And it really is I tried to come into each interview without any expectations. Because I want to just for for different reasons. But what I want to say is like even without having any expectations, this is lived up to every expectation I didn’t have. Because you’re such a you’re such an authentic person. And I think it definitely shines through in your passion for not only the outdoors but in, in creating creating these films around these things. And I think that’s kind of a testament to why you’re you’re so successful in why you why you’ve gone from creating just a simple video to now where you’re getting invited to races and you’re getting to do all these, these really awesome things. And so I just want to say at the end of the day, thank you. Thank you for being such an authentic, badass person.

Jeff Pelletier 

Well, I appreciate that. And thank you so much. This has been a really fun conversation as well. sort of took it to some places we don’t normally go so.

Adam Casey 

So that’s yeah, that’s my goal. Hey, As much as I love talking to runners every time I do I try my best to avoid new training plans. Yeah, nutrition new, you know, race day nutrition. Yeah, forbid I use the word bonk anywhere in the conversation. But yeah, but no, but this is this is hopefully the start of many conversations to come because I know you’ve got plenty of adventures coming down the pipeline, and I just I can’t wait to see what else you’ve got out there.

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